Corel VideoStudio Pro X3

For the last year or so I’ve been using Cyberlink PowerDirector 7 to create my videos. But a year is like….forever. In software circles. Time to see if there’s anything new available to improve my videos. First thing first – I bought a monopod. Far more convenient to carry around than a full tripod, far quicker to extend and put to use. A tripod would produce slightly better results, but if you don’t take it with you, then it’s no good at all.

Secondly, before I check out the new PowerDirector 8 video, I thought I’d check out the competition. Corel’s VideoStudio Pro X3 has just hit the virtual shelves, so a quick trial download and a walk around Mexico City’s Centro Historico later, I was ready to test it out. My first impression, was that the interface is sleek and easy to understand. Really very similar to PowerDirector’s UI, but easier on the eye. It also offers at start up the option to choose the advanced editor or the easy editor, which I guess is a nice touch for those new to video editing.

Putting together the clips I’d taken, trimming off unwanted bits of video and adding transitions, audio and text was a piece of cake. As it should be. I thought the transitions weren’t perhaps as inventive as on PowerDirector, but that’s a pretty minor matter. There sure were plenty of transitions to choose from.

The two biggest things for me though were in speed and rendering. Speed wise, Corel’s piece of software flies. But with rendering I have a bit of a problem. My laptop is prone to overheat and turn itself off if the rendering process goes on too long. I simply can’t, unfortunately, create huge file sizes. I’d like to, but it’s just not possible. With PowerDirector I have a much more flexible production facility that allows me to create a video file exactly as I want it. VideoStudio does have a wide range of options, but it is a little less flexible in this regards. But to be fair, this isn’t going to matter to the majority of users.

Anyway, without any further ado, here’s the video. The music is Ghost Geisha by PeerGynt Lobogris, available on Jamendo under a Creative Commons license.

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