Mexit

In light of recent events in the UK, I have decided that I must relocate this blog to a new abode. It is with a heavy heart that I make these changes but circumstance does rather dictate the future direction of anything, web sites included.

The website will be moved from servers based in the UK to new state of the art servers in Europe. Paris and Frankfurt are two options currently being examined. The domain name will also need to change, from it’s current home at garydenness.co.uk to garydenness.eu. Let’s face it, the European audience is an awful lot bigger than the UK audience.

Unfortunately, readers from the UK will need to pay a reasonable monthly membership fee to continue accessing the Mexile. Perhaps just a euro or two per week. I’ll possibly accept dollars. In fact, anything except British pounds and Monopoly money might do. I haven’t really given a moment’s consideration as to whether people will just stop coming round these parts and go somewhere else instead. But I think it’s best to just take the plunge and work out the exact details later. I’m sure people will come round to the idea.

Membership will also be granted on an arbitrary points based system designed to weed out the sickos. And people whose skin isn’t quite my shade of white. We want a certain sort of person here. If I don’t like the cut of your jib, you’re out sonny Jim. However, the shiny new points system may well just weed everyone out by accident. But again, I think it’s just best to change everything willy nilly and see how it goes. What could possibly go wrong? Once again, I have no idea. Not really stopped to think about this part.

In view of the Mexile becoming a European based blog, posts will all be written in French, which is far more appropriate given the new target audience. But just to liven things up, I will also have Slovakian Sundays and Finnish Fridays. Translators will be available for 99p per article. Maybe. Some translator company out there will do a deal with me, I’m sure. Although I haven’t actually asked anyone yet.

You might be wondering when these changes will occur. Don’t worry. For the time being nothing will change. I need to go through  a series of negotiations to get some new contracts signed. They will be more expensive than the current contracts, but that’s a price worth paying for…well, whatever it is that I think I’m doing.  But I will have everything changed over and running smoothly ready for the relaunch of the new, slightly harder to access, and considerably more expensive Mexile on April 1st 2017.

12 Comments

  • Brexit has achieved at a stroke what the Bank of England has been struggling to do for years: a competitive devaluation of the pound. Besides, do you really want to be overrun with Muslims when Angela Merkel opens the floodgates to Turkey? If you look into it with an open mind, you’ll find that non-Radical Islam is not the benign religion you might imagine. It’s a political system which doesn’t have much truck with non-believers. I know it’s heretical to say such things these days, but Islam is an idea, and in the West we debate the merits of ideas. I invite you to do the same.

    Happy Independence Day!

    Saludos,

    Kim G
    CDMX, México
    Where few apparently were even aware this was going on.

    • I live and work amongst Muslims every day. They are just normal people who go to work and live their lives. I don’t dispute that there are issues with radical Islam, but then there are problems with radical Christianity. And the Western world view for that matter. The Muslims that have made the UK home are by and large positive members of society. The ones I know appreciate British rules and customs and live within them. It’s too easy to debate Muslims as if they are simply an ideology and to forget that they are people.

      Turkey’s membership, if it ever comes, is an awfully long way off. I have huge reservations about further enlargement of the EU. Consolidation would be a better policy at the moment. But I suspect that there will be brakes on immigration by then. Sarkosy has touted Schengen 2 – a policy of open borders between countries with similar economies.

    • I live and work amongst Muslims every day. They are just normal people who go to work and live their lives. I don’t dispute that there are issues with radical Islam, but then there are problems with radical Christianity. And the Western world view for that matter. The Muslims that have made the UK home are by and large positive members of society. The ones I know appreciate British rules and customs and live within them. It’s too easy to debate Muslims as if they are simply an ideology and to forget that they are people.

      Turkey’s membership, if it ever comes, is an awfully long way off. I have huge reservations about further enlargement of the EU. Consolidation would be a better policy at the moment. But I suspect that there will be brakes on immigration by then. Sarkosy has touted Schengen 2 – a policy of open borders between countries with similar economies.

      • Take a look at this about Islam: it’s not just the radical version you have to fear. As for “radical Christianity,” just list the last dozen bloody attacks perpetuated in its name, and I’ll let up.

        • I’ll list one. The Second Gulf War. Sure, our guys wear suits and we apply better use of technology. But make no mistake, this was an ‘us and them’ issue. Some people referred to the US govt as neocons. Others as hawks. The word radical could also be applied. Perhaps you don’t want to define them as radical christians. But if they were allowed to define themselves, to describe their core beliefs and driving forces? I’m pretty certain that the word christian will be high up, if not at the top, of that list.

          Should we add up the dead and wounded each side has afflicted?

          • While I think the Gulf War 2 was a complete disaster, it was not done in the name of Christianity. American fighter pilots did not shout “God is Great” as the rained bombs down on Saddam Hussein. Furthermore, though wrong (and we agree about this) it was a state action carried out via democratic process. And had Hussein submitted to inspections, it certainly could have been averted.

            So Gulf War 2 is in no way comparable to Islamic terrorism.

          • These issues are complex. But if not in the name of christianity, then in the name of what? There’s a guilty party in there somewhere. And I believe it rests at the hands of people who define themselves as christians. I’m happy to make the comparison and feel it has sufficient validity. It also should be noted that I make the comparison very deliberately, to make a point.

            We certainly look at this from different perspectives and probably won’t agree on a set of answers. But that’s no problem. You can rest assured that i won’t turn up any time soon at your doorstep wearing a sheet and with several kilos of TNT strapped to my chest. I’m equally hopefully that you’ll refrain from dropping any bombs on my nice new house via a fancy drone.

            The problem is that there are too many people who feel that violence is a solution, and they are on both sides of the ‘us and them’ divide.

          • Well, I too abhor violence. Sadly, in the case of Islam, the more I read about it, the more disquieted I become. This is not normally the case for me when approaching a new topic. But the facts about the violence of political Islam are disturbing and deserve to be looked at closely. And they are a very different issue that US imperialism, which I personally oppose.

          • I’ve traveled to a half dozen muslim countries. The more I travelled, the less notice I took of what I read. Some countries are ‘better’ than others. The same goes for other regions around the world.

            If we all paid so much attention to what we read and hear, neither of us would have ever step foot in Mexico.

          • Mexico is actually the classic case where learning more reduces one’s fears. That said, I’m still nervous about crossing the streets, though!

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