Bicentenario 2010

It’s a big year for Mexico. There are anniversaries for the Revolution, Independence, the 1985 earthquake, and most importantly the 5th anniversary of my arrival in Mexico. But it’s the Revolution (100 years) and even more so the Independence Day (200 years) that I am focusing on. I have a new photo project, you see…

Over on my 3six5 photography blog, and on Flickr, I have started a project to collect as many images of the Bicentenario as possible. It’s a full one year project, and I hope to capture hundreds of images for my personal record of the events and celebrations, the artwork, the imagery….everything a camera can capture basically.

5 thoughts on “Bicentenario 2010

  1. This “Bicentenario” nonsense is gonna be politically manipulated to distract the masses from the most pressing problems such as unemployment and organized crime. I personally think there’s little to celebrate, especially the Revolucion. What were we before the Revolucion? A poor, unequal society dominated by oligarchs and a frivolous political class. What are we today? The same thing. And yet, the cost of the Revolucion was 1 million lives and 30 years of economic progress.

    I’m tired of all the empty nationalist rhetoric. Especially when it comes from politicians. I don’t want my taxes to be used for these silly “celebrations”. We’ve got 25 million people living in extreme poverty and 12 million people have decided to migrate -that is, their country didn’t even offer them the chance to live happily. Anything to celebrate, really?

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    1. I get what you’re saying. On the other hand though, these are the sort of events that many ordinary Mexicans enjoy and come together for. This will be my sixth Independence Day, and if the others are anything to go by, it will be a huge celebration. And all Mexicans will be celebrating. Are they celebrating anything worthwhile? Sometimes, I think, that the cause is less important than the act of having one day to get together to enjoy life.

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  2. To Daniel Sosa Tellez:

    Your anti-political nonsense is pure manipullation to distract the masses from the issue that there´s some things to celebrate and some causes in every country in Latin America to be proud of themselves, instead of the self-pity and constant crying that makes people THINK that they can have a good life abroad, instead of working to fix their own countries´ problems.

    Name me ONE country that is not a tax haven that doesn´t have unemployment or organized crime.

    I personally think there’s a lot to celebrate.

    What was India before independence? A poor, unequal society dominated by casts and the British empire. What are we today? The same thing: cheap labor and 40% illiteracy rate.

    I’m tired of all that empty “nationalist-denial” rhetoric. You can´t build ANY country without pride, self-conciousness and a desire to stay.

    Judging by your self-imposed standards, ANY celebrations (even those that occur once every 100 years) should never be done. There´s poverty and unemployment and children that die everywhere. By your standards countries shouldn´t invest in culture, organize festivals, fund movies, the arts, or science, if there´s someone starving, somewhere.

    “We’ve got 25 million people living in extreme poverty and 12 million people have decided to migrate -that is, their country didn’t even offer them the chance to live happily. Anything to celebrate, really?”

    U.S. economy leaving record numbers in severe poverty, highest in 3 decades
    http://www.commondreams.org/headlines07/0223-09.htm

    Anything to cross the border for, really?.

    FC

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    1. Hi Fernando,

      I am, I confess, in favor of the Independence celebrations, as I also believe it is one of the most important events in Mexican history, but more importantly, one which all Mexicans do tend to come together to celebrate.

      But in defence of Daniel, he’s not the only person I have met who believe the Bicentenario is an overly extravagant and overly expensive fiesta, occurring at a time when money is desperately needed in other areas.

      There are two sides to this argument, and I can personally see the points made on both sides. To be fair….they are both quite correct. I guess it’s about finding the balance.

      Daniel did concentrate on the Revolution though, and I think there’s an awful lot more support for his case there. Historically, the Revolution was a big black blot on Mexican’s history, not a golden turning point.

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