Twenty Eleven

Microsoft will buy Flickr, while MySpace will finally roll over and die. The UK’s coalition government will collapse, as will the EU economy. Paddington Bear will make a sensational return to the telly, and the Queen won’t die. Again. And I will produce 365 posts. Exactly 365 posts. Not one more, not one less. I think the object of this is to encourage bloggers to be more productive. I am going to use it as a means of reducing my productivity. Expect lots of photo posts.

Onwards Amigos

6 thoughts on “Twenty Eleven

  1. The Eu may see a little old time Latin debt management(DEFAULT) but it will stay solvent as a whole, my guess, the Tories are toast. The US and China may roll around in the dirt over the US running its printing presses night and day, my guess, the US will tell them to piss off on that matter. Here on the north shore of America, the factories seem to be going back to work. 11 will be better than 10 on the whole and much better than 8&9 put together.

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    1. The EU is hugely frustrating. The organisation does plenty of good things, including standardisation, funding, employee rights etc etc but when it comes to important global issues, it’s often weak. It’s also grown into an expensive and corrupt club that works in no-one’s interests but it’s own. I’m pro-EU, but less and less so for this EU.

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  2. Basic problem with any confederation is the lack of central power, the EU has that problem in spades. Every State/Nation wants to have it their way and there is not much the central government can do about it. The US found out pretty fast that its first government was too weak and decided to try Federalism, its held up well except for that period in the 1860s when we tried to kill each other in a very big way. And you are so right on the current EU’s government being a case of the tail wagging the dog.
    The best rule that the EU has is that there is freedom of movement as far as work. That rule will save the EU when States/Nations need to default on their debt, its the advantage of the common market.

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    1. I think EU collapse is more likely than federalism, although both are unlikely. The only problem with the freedom of movement to work is what it’s done to football….screwed the transfer market right up it has!

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  3. I think it will ride along the way it is, till a war rears its head, the confederation is too weak to protect the body as a whole. The US would help but the political will to fight as a group will be needed on the EU’s part and the confederation by its nature lacks the ability to fight wars on its own. A trade war might even foster a change in how power is shared in Europe but I think it would take a shooting/invasion type action to get the European polity to unite in a strong central government. As you said, not likely.

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    1. I can’t see a federal Europe ever happening, and there is one good piece of evidence to suggest that that idea is dead in the water. Current projections postulate that the UK will become the most populous country in the EU within a couple of decades, and also the wealthiest, making it the key nation in the union. And also the least federalist inclined…

      Having said that, the UK often gets berated by other EU members, notably France, for haggling, arguing and refusing to sign up for a large number of treaties and policies. And yet, once we’ve made our position clear, we do implement what we have agreed to. Unlike both France and Germany, who sign everything willy nilly and then do sod all to put them into action.

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