Rapist in Chief

I view politics very much through a British looking glass. You wouldn’t expect anything else. This means I’m inevitably going to be viewed as a commie by our American cousins and a capitalist pig by our Russian ex-friends. Both are simplistic labels proferred by simplistic minds. My political line of thought is easily summed up. If it’s too big to fail, essential infrastructure, a matter of national security, a social service or where human decency overrides the need for profit, it should be government run. Otherwise, we the people should be left to get on with it. There’s the ‘left’ and the ‘libertarian’ in me in in two shortish sentences. Of course, those two sentences are wide open to interpretation. You can have a crack at this quiz, if you care to. It’s pretty low brow, but still…

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With this in mind, you can probably imagine how I view US politics. Obama is not a socialist. Sanders is not a communist. Neither are even close. You guys really need to meet Jeremy Corbyn, our new-ish Labour leader. Some people would suggest Sanders is an American style Corbyn in many regards. I like Corbyn. He’s principled, decent and in the politics game to try to make a difference, rather than for his own furtherment. His analysis of real world politics and issues is spot on. Probably because he lives in the real world. Yet, I probably won’t vote for him. As things stand, I’ll vote Liberal. Because Corbyn is a weak leader whose specialty is protest not policy.

He’s a good guy in the wrong job. But he is not Britain’s Sanders. He is our Trump. You might not see how such a comparison works if you look at their respective policies and opinions. They couldn’t be more different. But policies don’t matter one jot if you don’t get a shot at the top job. What Trump and Corbyn do share is the ability to tear their own parties apart, to alienate the key floating voters and to gift their opponents the next election. This is the main reason behind my opposition to Corbyn.

My assumption, though, is that Trump will fall down in the primaries. He’ll get to the blue states, who’ll pick a moderate Republican and send Trump back to the tower. His tower, sadly. Not ours. We no longer behead crooks anyway. Trump is nuts. Despicable is not too strong a word.  He most definitely doesn’t live in the real world. It’s worrying that anyone who does would offer him their support. Frankly, Ted Cruz is no better.

You couldn’t make a parody of Trump. He is a walking talking parody already. Where does one even begin to list his misdemeanors? He’s figuratively raped the bank accounts of Americans and other citizens and governments around the world for decades. But perhaps more of a concern is the literal rape of his ex-wife. Is this just being ignored in the US? Have I missed something? Seriously, what’s the deal? There’s been no conviction, as is oft the case with this particular crime. But dear old Ivana was pretty clear in a statement under oath. He raped her. Then he gagged her through the courts. One of the joys of ‘freedom’. Can I get a hallelujah?

Nowadays, she says that he didn’t literally or criminally rape her. What does that even mean? He had her permission to rape her? Isn’t that sort of activity more commonly known as consensual intercourse? Is this just a British / American linguistic anomaly? Help me out guys. But I guess, more importantly, help yourselves out. You are the ones with a vote to cast in this election, not I. Don’t swallow the audio-visual Rophenol soundbites he’s throwing your way. Don’t give this guy your consent. He will shaft you all if he gets the opportunity.

14 thoughts on “Rapist in Chief

  1. My star fell in the same quadrant, I took the test twice, tweaking the response and it fell the same way both times.

    He will shaft you all if he gets the opportunity: is about right. He is just a spoiled rich kid who got tired of playing with his train set and wants to go out and cause a rumpus in the neighborhood.

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    1. All of these sorts of tests come with rather significant caveats etc etc. But if it puts us all in the expected ball park, well it can’t be so bad.

      There was a documentary on Trump a few nights ago on Channel 4. I think the one item that caught my attention was an incident in Scotland. He decided a house off in the distance was ugly and he didn’t want to see it. So he wanted a compulsory purchase order put on it so that he could knock it down. The strop he got into when he learned that this isn’t the way business is done in the UK was incredible. He went as far as creating huge earth mounds around the guys home.

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  2. I took the quiz and fell in exactly the same spot as you.
    As for Trump, I fear that it is becoming increasingly possible that he will win the nomination. I very much doubt that he could ever win the national election. If by some chance he does, I will be seriously thinking about moving to Mexico!

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  3. I fell into the right hand square!

    I suppose having owned my own company I can see from the other side the benefit of being an individual rather than a follower. There are certain freedoms when you are the captain of your own ship and working hard for yourself has great benefits both financial and spiritual in a way! Very often the achievement out ways the financial aspect, solving the puzzle and finding the missing piece to quote Maurice Sendak!

    However I feel that the US government and their partners in crime “big business” are working to undermine the freedoms we cherish so much! Why should a man loose his home because he broke his leg and the op and meds would put him in the poorhouse because he can’t afford the massive insurance premiums? How come the wealthiest country in the world treat their citizens so poorly? Because the government gave the rights to the wrong people! How come the wealthy Senators have free health care for their family for life, most can well afford it!

    When Steve mentioned recently his disappointment with Obama, my observation was that although his intentions were good once he got into the Oval orrifice he realized his hands were tied, the good ol’ boys had all the contracts all signed and sealed and at every turn they cornered him and shut him down!

    Personally I dislike bullies! At twelve years old I was the smallest lad in my school and on one occasion while being pushed and punched by the then junior boxing champion of Dublin and in a fist fight I knocked him out in the school yard!

    Trump is a bully, he is rude and vulgar in the sense that he is rough cut or unrefined. Sadly America today needs someone to grab the country by the horns and give it a good shake! Trump might be the one to do that, but I feel that he has really offered no solutions just insults to his hard working neighbour to the south who as we know are hard working and much maligned. Can you see him rubbing elbows with the elite in the European Community?

    You see we tend to forget that the President is only a figurehead for the country, all the activity is behind the scenes, under water if you will, it is a huge machine grinding away, day in and day out! They are doomed.. Nothing will get done just word play!

    I feel that the sophisticated bunch in the US Senate do not represent the majority of their minions and are only soothsayers but lining their own pockets!

    Am I the only one seeing this?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re not the only one seeing it. I think most people have a healthy level of contempt for their leadership, in Washington DC and elsewhere. The worst part is not the underhand corruption. There’s an awful lot of ‘legitimate’ activity that goes on there that would be illegal here.

      The world has swung too far to the right. For the sake of the next generation of Colms, we need to swing back a bit. Focus on building the right sort of platform for success – education, opportunity, support – and to break up what is becoming a more monopolized and corrupt market place by the day.

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  4. My star fell in the same quadrant as yours, Gary. Not too surprising really. Frankly, I think I’m economically more conservative than that particular quiz allows for, not to mention that I didn’t particularly like either “strongly agree” or “strongly disagree” for many of the questions, as such replies seemed extreme to me.

    I really believe in a “free market,” something the USA has strayed so far from in the past 15 years, that it almost seems to be a foreign concept. Right? We have enormous banks that were merged to their current size courtesy of a lazy FDIC/SEC/FED during the crisis. We have interest rates fixed by our central bank. (Which seems to think that the solution to a savings glut is to flood the market with even more money. WTF?) Our stock market is rigged in favor of lightning-fast algorithimic traders. And all the laws are written to favor special interests, and the elite get away with murder.

    But try to open an informal restaurant in your basement, and the full force of the law will come down on you. Frankly, it’s a pretty sick system these days.

    Saludos,

    Kim G
    México, DF
    Where most of the ways that poor people make money would be illegal in the USA.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m all for a free market, but with caveats. Some of which you mention. Self regulation, be it in finance, media or elsewhere, rarely, if ever, works. That is 100% the realm of government, who should be ensuring that the market remains fair. If it’s unfair, it’s hardly likely to be free. While people often complain that governments interfere too much, I’m more of the opinion that they fail to interfere when and where they are most needed.

      I also see little point in pretending monopolies operate within a free market. They don’t. Let’s take the railways for example. Every decade or so, the train operating companies have their franchises put up for tender, and bids are placed by the competitors. This is called competition. Yet at no point do consumers have any sort of choice as to who they travel with, with the exception of a few short runs her and there. Worse, all but one of the U.K. TOCs bid on the basis of how much in subsidies they will ale from the taxpayer, rather than how much they will contribute to the government coffers.

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