Cameras

iPhone v DSLR

This one is just for fun. I came across the video in one of my tech feeds, and it’s worth sharing. I know a lot of what is discussed is obvious. But it’s an interesting video nonetheless. How does an iPhone camera compare to one of the many Android or Windows phone cameras though? I’m not an iPhone user.

Could I be persuaded? Sure. The next generation just has to meet two very specific criteria to meet my needs. The screen size has to increase. A 4″ screen is soooo last decade. On the other hand, I don’t want a phablet. I’ve decided that the 4.7″ screen on my HTC One is the optimal screen size for a phone. Rumour has it that the new iPhone 6 may come in two sizes, with 4.7″ and 5.5″ screens. So they may be catering to my needs there.

The second criteria? Price. Apple products have always been given a premium price. I don’t mind paying a little more for a superior product. The iPhone remains the most expensive of the mainstream smartphones. But it is not the best. The premium is purely for having an Apple badge. And that’s not what I’d pay extra for. Heck, I can put an Apple sticker on a phone for free.

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Cameras

Sensor Size Guide

Size matters. I’m talking sensors. There’s a few guides/illustrations out there but this is one of the better ones I’ve seen in a while. The Sony RX1R looks impressive does it not? The NEX6 shares the same sensor. And perhaps you can see why I wonder about the future of the Micro Four Thirds cameras. They got the larger lens/compact body/interchangelable lens (now know as Compact System Cameras) to market first. But when rival makers now produce equipment that’s just as good with substantially larger sensors….well Olympus and Panasonic have their work cut out keeping up.

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Cameras

Farewell to the Fuji

I recently sold my Fuji X-S1. It’s a fine camera. Really fine. We had a great time together. Alas, I own two cameras but can afford to keep only one. The keeper is my three/four year old Olympus Pen E-PL1. Truth be told, the Fuji is in many ways the better camera. It has a far more powerful and flexible lens, which is also a better lens quality wise. ¬†It’s a more intelligent camera too, getting focus, aperture and ¬†shutter speed right more often. With a better flash to boot. The LCD screen on the back is infinitely superior and it had a decent EVF.

The Olympus does have it’s trump cards too though. The bigger sensor means I get far better low light results, especially when it’s handheld. It’s also smaller and lighter and much easier to travel around with. Image quality, when the settings are just right, can just eclipse the results I pulled from the Fuji. I like the Olympus a lot. It’s final trump card? It is, or will soon be, four years old and has since been replaced several times with newer models. It has no resale value. The Fuji, on the other hand, being just a year old and having not been replaced with a newer model, fetched a handsome price.

I will miss the Fuji. It will almost certainly be the last Bridge camera I buy. I’ve owned a few of them over the years – a Nikon Coolpix 8700, a Panasonic FZ35, a Fuji HS10 and the X-S1. But the new generation of Compact System Cameras make too compelling an argument for me to think I’ll ever go the Bridge route again. A CSC can be pocketable when you need a lightweight companion. And it can fit some powerful zoom lenses when the occasion calls for one. So it is adios not just to the X-S1, but to a whole genre of camera.

Have I made the right decision? Here’s the final photo I took with the Fuji. Nothing special. The telling point is the date I took it. September. Quite a while ago. If it’s too hefty to want to lug it around, then it’s time to move it on.

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